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Studio Lift up Table

Studio Lift up Table by James McKay

Walnut and Matt Black Melamine coffee table with lift up surface for working and recreation. Internal storage.

410h x 485d x 1200w (mm)

Studio Lift up Table

Studio Lift up Table by James McKay

Walnut and Matt Black Melamine coffee table with lift up surface for working and recreation. Internal storage.

410h x 485d x 1200w (mm)

Dining Table in Native Oak

Dining Table in Native Oak by Anna Childs and John Thatcher

Features waney-edged boards, brass set in resin filling the natural cracks and knot-holes, and wedged through mortise and tenons.

Dining chairs

Dining chairs by Design in Wood

in oak and burr madrona.

Chest of drawers

Chest of drawers by Design in Wood

in walnut, maple and and sycamore.

Equus Tabula. Console Table

Equus Tabula. Console Table by Richard Jones

H 910 X W 1160 W X D 395 mm
American black cherry top and poplar frame. Poplar dyed and lacquered: cherry clear lacquered.

Equus Tabula. Console Table

Equus Tabula. Console Table by Richard Jones

H 910 X W 1160 W X D 395 mm
American black cherry top and poplar frame. Poplar dyed and lacquered: cherry clear lacquered.

Equus Tabula. Console Table

Equus Tabula. Console Table by Richard Jones

H 910 X W 1160 W X D 395 mm
American black cherry top and poplar frame. Poplar dyed and lacquered: cherry clear lacquered.

Cabinet in Walnut

Cabinet in Walnut by Anna Childs and John Thatcher

Influenced by traditional Chinese cabinets. The doors have dowelled hinges. Inside, a shelf and two drawers (with boxes hidden behind each drawer)

The Graduate Cabinet

The Graduate Cabinet by Richard Jones

Cherry, walnut, and maple. Varnished external parts and lacquered internal parts. 1100 mm X W 610 mm X D 470 mm. (H 43-1/4” X W 24” X D 18-1/2”) Price: £4500

Some years ago I was sketching and experimenting with leg shapes, including the traditional cabriole leg. Suddenly something like this variation of the cabriole leg form appeared on the paper; I was intrigued by it even though I had no particular use for it at the time.

Later I decided the leg form was appropriate for a hall table I was designing and building and the leg became slender and delicate. Hall tables or console tables don't need sturdiness in the same way that cabinets do as they are primarily decorative. I wished to explore the use of this variation of the cabriole leg in other pieces of furniture, particularly in cabinet furniture.

The end result was this chest of drawers incorporating two contrasting woods, each bringing out the beauty of the other. The sweeping curves of the legs are reflected in the drawer pulls, and the long chamfer on the underside of the top ensure a slim edge and geometrical angularity to contrast with the sweeping curves in the legs. Each drawer front is taller than the one above it to create the visual impression of growth.

There is no specified function that it 'should' perform. But, perhaps it could store a musicians sheet music and act as a collector’s cabinet. If placed in a hallway or living area it could serve as a focal point. Do the drawers really need filling at all?

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